Wild Boar - Treatment & Control | Love The Garden

Wild Boar

British Wild Boar in the Woods

Although still rare, the increasing British wild boar population has resulted in more confrontations between wild boars and humans. And, so their presence in our gardens is increasing too. These large mammals can cause extensive damage to gardens by trampling plants and digging up large areas in their search for food.

Description

You'll probably know when you have a wild boar in your garden! They are large mammals that can weigh up to 136kg (300lb) and will rampage through the garden.

They are omnivorous with huge appetites and will rootle around in the garden looking for something/anything to eat. This includes grubs in the ground, fruit, vegetables and ornamental plants.

The incidents of wild boar attacks on people are very rare, but as with all animals – whether wild, domestic or farmed – there is always the element of unpredictability. So approach them with extreme care and certainly don’t attempt to corner them or they will attack.

Symptoms

Being very large animals, wild boars will cause extensive damage, including trampling down plants and uprooting them. They can even knock over shrubs, small trees, garden ornaments and other items.

They dig around in the soil looking for insects, often digging up plants in the process.

They will dig holes in the lawn, damaging large areas, looking for grubs, such as leatherjackets and chafer grubs and worms. In a very short time, they can make the whole lawn look like a badly ploughed field.

Treatment and Control

Nothing, apart from a strong wall, will stop a very hungry wild boar getting into your garden. Although strong, sound fences will usually deter them, a determined boar will simply knock it down.

As wild boars are often attracted to the smell of ripening or rotting fruit, make sure you pick and collect all fruit in the garden regularly.

Some wild boars, are actually escapees from wild boar farms. If you can see any distinguishing marks that suggest this is where yours has come from, contact the farm and ask them to come and remove it. And even suggest they pay for the damage!

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