Teachers Resources - Kids' Course Plans | Love The Garden

Teacher's Resources - Course Plan Overview For Years 1-6

child planting seeds

Course Plan Overview for Years 1 & 2

*Please Note: The below course plan overview is linked to the National Curriculum of Science Objectives from 2014

What is a plant?

  • What makes a plant a plant? Compare plants with humans, animals and inanimate objects, identifying similarities and differences.
  • Are all plants the same?
  • Are all leaves the same? Collect and sort leaves according to size/shade/shape.
  • Are all flowers the same? Collect a selection of petals and sort according to colour/shape.
  • Are all seeds the same?
  • How can we tell that a tree is a plant? Are all trees the same?
  • How can a tree help humans?
  • Seasonal change.
This meets the following Science Objectives (2014).
  • Explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead and things that have never been alive.
  • Ask simple questions and realise they can be answered in different ways.
  • Identify and classify
  • Identify and name a variety of common plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.
  • Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.
Growing plants from seeds
  • How do plants grow? Grow plants from seeds to study the formation of stems, roots and leaves.
  • Experiment to find out their requirements for strong growth including light, water and nutrients.
  • Grow peas in paper and in compost. Compare results. What do the results teach us? 
  • Draw plants, name parts and their function and save seeds.
This meets the following Science Objectives (2014).
  • Observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.
  • Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.
  • Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  • Perform simple tests.
  • Use observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  • Gather and record data to help answer questions.
Producing evidence

Use photographs together with examples of work to produce a scrapbook showing the activities and experiments carried out by the children. It should include the results of their growing experiments and could include links to other areas of the curriculum, eg art, creative writing, poetry, performing arts.

The best examples will be included in the Growing Results Laboratory display at Chelsea Flower Show 2015.

 

Useful Resources

KS1: Growing Seeds

KS1 Food Chains

KS1 Variations in Plants

KS1 Plants are Living Things

KS1 What Do Plants Give Us?

KS1 What Do Plants Need to Grow?

 

Course Plan Overview for Years 3 & 4

Food chains & webs.
  • How does a plant fit into a food chain? Study the different types of food eaten by animals. Classify herbivores, carnivores and omnivores.
  • Plants and their use of sunlight are how all living things on earth survive. Study simple food chains and webs, starting with the sun.
  • What happens to a plant when it dies? Does it remain in the food chain?
This meets the following Science Objectives (2014).
  • Construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.
  • Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.
  • Recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.
Growing plants from seeds
  • What happens when a seed germinates?
  • The life cycle of a plant. Study pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
  • Grow a range of different plants to study seed formation and dispersal.
  • Experiment to find out if a plant will grow in less than ideal conditions? Compare plants grown with and without soil, light or moisture. What happens to a plant if you remove the leaves?

This meets the following Science Objectives (2014).

  • Identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers.
  • Explore the requirements of plants for growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant.
  • Investigate the way in which water is transported within plants.
  • Explore the parts flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
  • Ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquiry to answer them.
  • Set up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests.
  • Make systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate take accurate measurements using standard units.
  • Report on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions.
  • Use results to draw simple conclusions, making predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions.
  • Identify differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes.
  • Use straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support findings.
Producing evidence

Use photographs and examples of work to produce a scrapbook showing the activities and investigations carried out by the children. It should include the process and results of their growing experiments. It could include links to other areas of the curriculum, eg art, creative writing, poetry, performing arts.

The best examples will be included in the Growing Results Laboratory display at Chelsea Flower Show 2015.

 

Useful Resources

Most clips listed for Year 1 and 2, PLUS these below:

KS2 Healthy Plant Growth

KS2 How Does Fruit Grow?

KS2 How Plants Produce Seeds

KS2 How Shots and Roots Grow

KS2 Runner Beans Growing

KS2 Seed Dispersal

KS2 Why Do Plants Have Leaves

KS2 Why Do Plants Need Roots?

KS2 Why Do Plants Need Water?

 

Course Plan Overview for Years 5 & 6

Pollination and the pollinators

  • What is a pollinator? Study the mechanism of the pollination of plants and the role of pollinators.
  • Grow selection of plants popular with pollinators. If the quality of the plant is improved through feeding does it attract more pollinators?
  • Follow the Government’s latest initiative to increase the pollinator population.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-pollinator-strategy-for-bees-and-other-pollinators-in-england

Watch the film at http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/bees-needs

  • Use persuasive writing to encourage your local council to grow more plants for pollinators?
This meets the following Science Objectives (2014).
  • Plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary.
  • Use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.
  • Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of and a degree of trust in results, in oral and written form such as displays and other presentations.
  • Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas and arguments.
  • Give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.
  • Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.
Growing plants from seeds
  • What is soil? How is it created? Study decomposition and energy exchange in the food chain.
  • Grow easy flowering plants to see if home-made compost is better than garden soil in producing bigger plants with more flowers and more seeds.
  • Grow a selection of vegetable plants to find out the best method of feeding additional nutrients. Does the feeding of additional nutrients affect the flavour of the crop?
This meets the following Science Objectives (2014).
  • Plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary.
  • Use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.
  • Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, casual relationships and explanations of and a degree of trust in results, in oral and written form such as displays and other presentations.
  • Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas and arguments.
Producing evidence

Produce plants of suitable size and quality for inclusion in the Food for Life Garden at Chelsea Flower Show.

Use photographic evidence and examples of work to produce a journal showing the enquiries, activities and experiments carried out by the children. It should include the methodology and results of their growing experiments and could include links to other areas of the curriculum, eg art and design, persuasive writing.

Produce plants that show the results of their experiments for display in the Growing Results Laboratory at Chelsea Flower Show 2015.

Some schools might like to produce models that demonstrate plant reproduction or the relationship between flowers and the pollinators.

 

Useful Resources

Most clips listed for Year 1-2, and Year 3-4 PLUS these below:

Why are butterflies and bees attracted to plants?

What do plants need to grow?

Would we starve without bees?

Brilliant bees

 

X

Subscribe to our newsletter

Subscribe to free garden tips and advice now. (No spam, we promise).